fanarts_series
21 July 2017 @ 10:48 am
Some fanarts update  
First all the links if you want to give a kuddo or let a comment.

Banner and Wallpaper mcshep and mcbeckett

archiveofourown.org/works/11566119





Banner crossover NCIS, Marvel and Agents of the shield


Bruce Banner/Tony StarkPhil Coulson/Tony DiNozzo

Preview 








 
 
Punk
19 July 2017 @ 09:58 am
Selected Poems, by William Carlos Williams  
Selected Poems, by William Carlos Williams: Holy shit, it has to be noted—and I did not do this on purpose—but it took me five years exactly to read this book. I started reading it on July 11, 2012, and finished it on July 11, 2017.

That's exactly how slow going it was.

To my disappointment, not everything William Carlos Williams wrote is as accessible as "The Red Wheelbarrow" and "This is Just to Say," two of his most famous poems. Instead, there's a mix of transparent and opaque.

And then there's Paterson, which he's also known for, a five-volume epic poem that here is presented in extracts, taking up about forty pages instead of its usual three hundred, and seems to be about a grasshopper, a park, geography, some text from a medical journal, a personal letter, and a history lesson. I don't know if it would have made more sense if I had read it in its entirety, but I'm not interested in finding out.

Williams liked to experiment with white space and sentence fragments—he's a contemporary of e e cummings and T. S. Eliot—but his white space lacks the energy and enthusiasm of cummings, or, later, of Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Mostly it just looks jumbled, or unnecessarily spread out, staggered like the teeth of a zipper. The chopped up, incomplete sentences were coarse and seemed to impede meaning rather than free it. I didn't feel like I was discovering or feeling something; I felt like I was tripping over it.

For such a long volume, my notes with my favorite poems and lines don't even take up a whole index card, and I was definitely experiencing William Carlos Williams fatigue by the end. The book collects selected poems from 1914 to 1962, and I found Charles Tomlinson's introduction to be wordy and almost breathless in tone but informative about Williams and his poetry style, though more useful after I'd read the book than before.

My favorite discovery has to be the complete Pictures from Brueghel series. I'd read parts of it before, but didn't realize there was more to it. It's ten poems based on works by Brueghel the Elder, who I encounter quite often in poetry. There's something about his paintings that draws poets to him. It's probably the level of detail, all the little stories going on in these huge lush landscapes full of color and people and animals. The poems I've read have all evoked such clear images, even if I'm unfamiliar with the paintings themselves, and Williams's work is no exception. Though, as always, in order to enjoy Williams's "Landscape with the Fall of Icarus" to its fullest, you benefit by knowing the joke behind Brueghel's "Landscape with the Fall of Icarus" and the tiny splash Icarus makes down in the corner of the painting where no one is even looking. Just his leg sticking out of the water. Williams captures the humor and sadness of that image, still giving it only slightly more attention than Brueghel did.

It seems I like Williams best when he's being simple and transparent. His complicated, fractured works don't appeal to me as much, and it feels like this collection is more geared toward the latter. But could be it only felt like it.

Contains: rape, classism, and racist language and attitudes.
 
 
Cassie Morgan
17 July 2017 @ 07:35 am
The Morning Wibble  
And so Monday beings )
 
 
 
 
Punk
16 July 2017 @ 10:02 am
Gluten-Free Sweet Treats: Cakes, Brownies, Cookies and More, by Emma Goss-Custard  
Gluten-Free Sweet Treats: Cakes, Brownies, Cookies and More, by Emma Goss-Custard: First, this book is British and, as an American, parts of it made no sense to me. The "gluten-free storecupboard" section at the back goes through various ingredients and where to find them but failed to address my many questions. Mixed spice? Stem ginger in syrup? Damsons?? Turns out those're plums. I know this because I can use Google, but I had to go out of my way for it, and I feel like I'd have to go out of my way to find many of these ingredients, which is an obstacle. The other problem is cultural. I'm never going to make spotted dick because the name makes me want to gag.

Still, the cookbook is adorable and has many good qualities, and there are even a few recipes I'd like to try, but at a certain point I gave up because too many of the ingredients aren't things I keep around. Lyle's Golden Syrup and Lemon Oil amongst them. I continued to flip through and look at the nice pictures, but with less of an expectation I'd find something I could make out of my cupboard.

The good news is that every recipe stands on its own. The book doesn't require a custom flour blend. It uses a lot of polenta, ground nuts and seeds, and very little rice flour. It doesn't address flour substitutions, though. There's an emphasis on fresh fruits, as well as different levels of cream (clotted, double, fraîche). Weirdly a lot of the chocolate recipes call for dark and milk chocolate. Not something I see a lot.

The book itself has cute graphics and a colorful layout. I love that each recipe has an info box that tells the size/number of items it makes, baking time, and if/where/how long it can be stored. The introduction to each recipe sometimes suggests flavor variations but only rarely describes the taste and texture of the item. Add that to the fact it only has colored pictures for a third of the recipes, and that means I only have the ingredient list to go by when judging what the final product is going to be like, and in gluten-free baking it's basically impossible to guess the outcome of throwing together a bunch of nut flours and cornstarch. The British call cornstarch "cornflour" by the way. No way that can end badly.

The recipes give amounts in volume and weight (ounces and grams), and there's a helpful index and an abbreviated introduction to gluten-free baking.

Not something I'm going to come back to, but might be a great cookbook if you're gluten-free and in the UK or have gastronomical ties to the region.
 
 
Cassie Morgan
16 July 2017 @ 09:42 am
The Sunday Wibble-a-thon  
Yesterday was a nice chill day, mostly spent catching up on youtube channels. Today I would like to get some words written and I would like to get some stuff done around the house. No pressure on myself, just if it gets done then great, if not, then that's also ok. I'm still reeling from getting so stressed Thurs/Fri and I've got a few big weekends coming up so...

The Sunday Wibble-A-Thon> <img src= )
 
 
 
 
antares_dw
16 July 2017 @ 07:24 am
SGA-Art, After the Apocalypse (challenge #4)  
( You're about to view content that the journal owner has advised should be viewed with discretion. )
 
 
Lucy
15 July 2017 @ 04:44 pm
Naming Names  
S has just posted to say she doesn't think she likes using her name as her DW account and is asking her flist how they came up with their usernames. I thought that was quite an interesting question and it makes me want to ask you guys How did you come up with your username?

Mine is based off the character Lucifer Morningstar from the TV show Lucifer. The basic premise of the show is that Lucifer got bored of hell, left, is running a nightclub in LA and working with a homicide detective. He makes no secret of who he is, goes by the name of Lucifer Morningstar. One of his brothers, Amenadiel, calls him Lucy which I love because... well because it's name.

And so... [personal profile] lucymorningstar is me
although Morningstar clearly isn't my surname. (For anyone who's wondering, I changed it by deedpoll a few years ago so it's Anderson, the same as J and S)
 
 
Current Mood: curious
 
 
Lucy
10 July 2017 @ 01:08 pm
An actual update!  
If I just start posting like normal, no-one will notice I haven't been posting regularly, right?

Hello friends. Sorry for disappearing on you. Everything went crazy around here and I've been really struggling with my health because I've been so stressed out. And the one thing that seems to get dropped is finding time to do things that I enjoy. It's a really bad habit of mine that when I go into survival mode, I forget about me. And blogging/journalling is really good for my mental health, it helps me try to gt things out of my head and into a way that I can try and make sense of. So my bad habit of neglecting myself is something I really want to start working on and I'm going to bring it up with my new therapist.

Yes, a new one. One of the crazy things thats happening around here is that we're moving. I'm really stressed about it :(
S has been headhunted and has changed jobs but it's down in Cardiff so we're moving. We're supposed to be moving around August bank holiday Monday and then S is due to start her new job in September. She's really excited more it's more pure physics-centric than her current role which is more engineering based.

But!
Because there's always a but, right?
A couple of weeks ago, she broke her leg really badly. Like had to have pins put it in badly and was told that she has to have a cast on for 'at least three months' which takes her up to the beginning of September so she doesn't even know if she's going to be able to start taking her classes when the semeste starts

I'm really stressed for her but she's of the view that what will be will be, if she can't start classes in the Autumn semester, she'll start in Spring. Her new boss knows that she's injured and out of action and they're just taking it as it comes.

Mostly, she's just bored. That can be quite fun for me and J haha. She's getting better at getting around on crutches so we're hoping to be able to do some family activities over the summer. We've been doing a lot of 'Netflix and chill' and we're doing a Doctor Who rewatch which is fun. She's also got herself a DW which is [personal profile] samanderson. And she's learning to knit - and so am I!

Well. This post seems to have mostly been about S and I think I've rambled enough for today. Have a good week!
 
 
Cassie Morgan
15 July 2017 @ 11:19 am
The Saturday Wibble-a-thon  
The morning is almost over but it's been a good one. I was up Tesco bright and early this morning, got my shopping done and put away. I'd been craving Rice Krispies for a few days and treated myself to some this morning... best bowl of cereal ever I swear.

The rest of the morning has been spent listening to music and reading.

The Morning Wibble )
 
 
 
 
Punk
14 July 2017 @ 04:39 pm
And Then There Were None, by Agatha Christie  
And Then There Were None, by Agatha Christie: From Christie's author's note: "I wrote the book after a tremendous amount of planning, and I was pleased with what I had made of it. It was clear, straightforward, baffling, and yet had a perfectly reasonable explanation; in fact it had to have an epilogue in order to explain it."

It was so perfectly explainable that she had to add an extra bit to the story to explain it. Yes, that makes perfect sense. I often find my own writing to be so straightforward it requires an epilogue to explain.

This is only my second Agatha Christie book, and the only thing I remember about the first one is that it had a million characters and maybe some Siamese cats? I figured this one would at least have fewer characters. I read it because I recently finished Yukito Ayatsuji's The Decagon House Murders, which references this book in both the text and the premise, and I wanted to see how closely the two were related. Ayatsuji borrows a lot from Christie, and adds his own interesting twist on the murderer.

As for Christie, I didn't care much about the characters, and the writing is awkward thanks to a disjointed dialogue style that depends heavily on adverbs, like:

She said grimly:

"This woman was poisoned. Possibly by a toxic amount of -ly adverbs."

He said doubtfully:

"Surely that's not possible?"

She said grimlyer:

"Oh, it's totally possible."

And, as previously complained, the mystery had to be explained in an epilogue. Which isn't how I like my mysteries to be solved.

Contains: antisemitism, colonialism, racism.
 
 
Cassie Morgan
14 July 2017 @ 09:39 pm
One step forward, two steps back  
Yesterday was another really good, positive, productive work day. Then I got home. Opened my post and there's a fine, for driving my car untaxed. Huh, I think, that's strange, I never got a reminder. Rang the company to query and apparently DVLA still have my old address on record. I tell them I notified them when I moved over three years ago.

Ring up the DVLA to lodge a complaint. They state they never received my notification. I tear my flat apart and I cannot find my log book anywhere, so I think what happened is that I sent it, they never got it and I never realised that I didn't get it back. I got my driving license back ok though, and that's the same fucking DVLA... right.

So, I can't tax it over the phone because it's registered to a different address. No-one is actually able to tell my why just that it's policy. I argue that the situation was the same in September last year yet I was able to tax her over the phone then. Again, no-one had an answer for why...
We've covered that they're fucking useless, right?

I end up having to take the morning off work to go into town (rang my boss last night in panicked hysteria), go to the post office, fill in a 'lost log book' form (making it very clear I sent it to them in May 2014 and that I was very unhappy at having to pay a £25 fee for a replacement for 'losing' it). Then the lump sum for the 6 months tax wiped out my savings. I couldn't set up a DD because of the whole 'wrong address' issue.

This evening I rang up the fine company again and they've at least let me set up a payment plan so I don't have to try and find that. That's a nice £17 a month for the next few months.
I also asked if an apology could get back to the girl I'd spoken to last night because in hindsight I was rude to her (although lets face it, you shouldn't work in the inbound call centre for debt collectors if you can't handle stressed/pissed/angry people!)

I may sound calm as I'm writing this but I'm still stressed out as fuck. I'm very pissed - at the DVLA and myself. I'm embarrassed. I'm stress eating - and just aware enough that I'm doing it but not healthy enough that my coping techniques are working.
 
 
 
 
Ariane
14 July 2017 @ 07:00 pm
Dark Skies 1.01 The Awakening (Re-Capped)  
I'm re-capping Dark Skies which still remains one of my biggest loves (read: obsessions), using the much better de-interlacing method I discovered about two years ago. So these screencaps are new and much better quality than the old ones.

First up, 1.01 The Awakening:



The usual rules apply – credit, don’t hotlink, don’t ask for zips/rars

Gallery: Home > Dark Skies > 1.01 The Awakening
 
 
Ariane
14 July 2017 @ 05:08 pm
Versailles 2.03 Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes Screencaps  
Bluray caps from Versailles episode 2.03 Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes are up!



The usual rules apply – credit, don’t hotlink, don’t ask for zips/rars

Gallery: Home > Versailles > Season 2 > 2.03 Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes
 
 
Punk
13 July 2017 @ 02:53 pm
free ebook: Kushiel's Dart  
Tor.com has this eBook of the Month Club where every month they give away an ebook for a week, and then for the rest of the month there are discussion posts and whatnot. Because it's Tor, the books are always DRM-free, and you can get them in mobi or epub—though only if you live in the US or Canada; sorry, everyone else.

This month, Tor's giving away Kushiel's Dart, by Jacqueline Carey, and I know fandom's got a thing about this series, so I'm passing it along. I think the only reason I know about it in the first place is because of fandom and the crossover/fusion fics that borrow its premise. Which, to quote from that Fanlore article, is:
The books take place in an alternate-Europe during the Renaissance; the primary setting is a country called Terre d'Ange, which is a France-analogue. Its people practice an invented religion whose primary tenet is "Love as thou wilt" - as a result all forms of lovemaking are sacred, and in canon most characters are assumed to be bisexual and there are multiple examples of relationships involving BDSM and polyamory.
So go sign up if this sounds like your sort of thing. You'll get Tor's newsletter, but I honestly enjoy having it pop up in my inbox. Tor.com has interesting articles about science fiction and fantasy, and really great free short fiction, and the newsletter gives you little blurbs about them maybe once a week.

Legal stuff: Kushiel's Dart will be available from July 13th-19th. Download before 11:59 PM ET July 19th, 2017.
 
 
Punk
13 July 2017 @ 01:37 pm
Gluten-Free Cookies, by Luane Kohnke  
Gluten-Free Cookies: From Shortbreads to Snickerdoodles, Brownies to Biscotti: 50 Recipes for Cookies You Crave, by Luane Kohnke: Did I take a star off this rating (on Goodreads) because the author used the phrase "yummy-in-the-tummy" (in quotation marks no less?!) in one of the introductions to a recipe? No, but I wanted to. I wanted to so much.

Instead, I will ignore that, and focus on the positives, because there are so many of them. To start with: This book does not require a custom flour mix! Each recipe tells you exactly what you need to make it. The measurements are by volume only, though, which I find to be a bummer in gluten-free cooking. I'm going to try the ginger molasses cookies first, and maybe fool around with converting the measurements to weight using an online calculator or chart. If I can find two that agree.

Most of these cookies are made with brown rice flour and almond flour, along with tapioca and potato starch. The recipes call for xanthan gum, but Kohnke says you can substitute guar gum straight across, which goes against everything I've read, but I guess you can experiment with that if it's your thing. Some of the cookies call for vegetable shortening, which I don't cook with, but I've had good results using ghee or clarified butter in place of Crisco, so I'll try that here. The book has an introduction that goes over ingredients, cooking techniques, and tools for those people who are just starting out, but it doesn't get into substitutions much so you're on your own there. And while these recipes don't require a custom flour blend, they are based on Kohnke's own mix. She says you can use it in your favorite wheat flour-based recipes, too, and provides a handy chart to convert a cup of wheat flour to a cup of her blend with all the individual ingredients listed, so you still don't have to mix up a batch of it and have it hanging around.

The recipes cover a lot of the basics: chocolate chip, gingerbread, jam thumbprint, oatmeal, snickerdoodle, shortbread, biscotti, flourless peanut butter. There are sections on kids' cookies (for kids and/or to make with kids), bar cookies and brownies, holiday cookies, and meringues. One of these things is not like the others.

Each recipe has an introduction that describes the cookie's flavor and texture, and at the bottom it tells you how to store them and how long they'll last. There are lovely color photos for each cookie, and a useful index that is sorted by recipe and ingredients. So you can look for "ginger molasses cookie" or "molasses" and find it in both places. This is definitely a book I'll come back to.
 
 
Ariane
13 July 2017 @ 03:07 pm
Jeri Ryan - The Sentinel 4.01 Sentinel Too, Part 2 Screencaps  

I’ve added DVD caps from The Sentinel episode 4.01 Sentinel Too, Part 2 to the gallery :)

Gallery: Home > Screencaps > TV Series > The Sentinel > 4.01 Sentinel Too, Part 2

 
 
Cassie Morgan
13 July 2017 @ 07:26 am
The Morning Wibble  
Hey look at me, actually awake in the morning and not just running blindly out the door to work!

Pretty lives here )
 
 
 
 
Punk
12 July 2017 @ 03:26 pm
The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue, by Mackenzi Lee  
The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue, by Mackenzi Lee: Henry "Monty" Montague is off to the continent for his Grand Tour with his best friend Percy and, unfortunately, Monty's little sister and a chaperone. But Monty's dad, The Duke of Whatever, is totally fed up with Monty's rake-like behavior and sets down some strict rules Monty has to follow if he wants to learn how to run the estate when he comes back. Uh, spoiler, he doesn't he follow them.

Elsewhere, I described this as a romp, and I stand by it. It's rompy. It's queer. Monty seemingly goes all ways, and in fact reminds me a lot of some James T. Kirks I've encountered in fanfic—rough childhood, convinced of his own awesomeness (as a defense mechanism), will kiss anything with a mouth, and totally, deeply in love with his best friend who has dark skin and can't eat with the family when company comes. This metaphor is breaking down, but Percy is mixed race, and while Monty might be totally oblivious to what this means for Percy, Percy is more than aware of it, and even if Monty doesn't notice, the story does, which I appreciated a lot.

I couldn't help but like Monty even though he's a self-absorbed little shit. He's loveable and slappable in equal measure. Percy adores him, so there has to be something about him we didn't get to see since we apparently meet him at his worst. In keeping with this, Monty's quest was totally dumb, and if he'd listened to ANYONE even ONCE in his LIFE then NONE of this would have HAPPENED, but then you don't have a book, or a guy who can learn from his mistakes. Which I'm not sure he ever does, but whatever. He cries a lot, too, which I dig.

Good hurt/comfort, friends-to-lovers with lots of sweet snuggling and intimate non-sexual contact, in addition to some brief sexual contact. And a kick-ass sister. Fun, super queer, and a happy (if unrealistic) ending.

Contains: violence, child abuse, suicidal thoughts, racism, homophobia, upsetting attitudes towards chronic illness/disability.
 
 
Cassie Morgan
12 July 2017 @ 09:06 pm
'cause tonight's the night the world begins again  
I've been back on the meds for 12 days now and I think I've finally ridden out the waves of side-effects. I'm still not myself, that's going to take a while but I'm finding things just a little easier. That's possibly a placebo since it's not even been two weeks but I'm not going to complain.

I was told I look more like myself today. That made me smile. (Although, who have I been looking like if not myself?

Today was also one of those days where everything fell into place with work. I had a really productive day and it was one of those where every time I blinked the clock had shot forward. I was able to finally resolve a couple of really big, ongoing, frustrating, accounts issues which made me feel awesome.

I wasn't completely wiped out when I got in either which made a nice change. I had enough energy to catch up on all the dishes that needed washing. I cooked (ok, took a frozen dinner out and nuked it) and watched The Lego Movie. I'm about hitting a wall now, ability-to-can wise, though but this is the best I've been in about 6 weeks.

I don't know if this is the beginning of a positive upwards trend or 'just' A Good Day - either way, I'm not complaining. I mean, I'd really like to find my old routine again - there's plenty of stuff I miss doing but I also know better than to push myself. Right now, if all I'm managing is one thing around the house of an evening? Well, that's better than the other week. So maybe next week I will aim to make my evenings be 'one thing in the house, cook/eat/watch and then make the effort to come online and blog/read my flist.
 
 
Current Mood: hopeful
Current Music: Sum 41 - In Too Deep
 
 
Punk
11 July 2017 @ 09:51 am
tuesday list  
  • I know
  • you don't hear from me for like
  • a month
  • and then it's a blast of
  • 100% BOOK REVIEWS
  • I got a little behind
  • and had a health thing
  • a year from now
  • I won't be able to tell which
  • "health thing" I meant there
  • as it's really more of a plural situation
  • just to give you an idea
  • of how things are going
  • with me